Is the PROMPT approach effective?

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Yay! We are back to blogging about research. You can check out what research says about other speech and language related topics over at Gray Matter Therapy. The blogger does an awesome job of rounding up speech pathologists around the nation to read research and blog about it.

This month I, along with other therapists from our office, are going through the big PROMPT training. While I hear so many good things about the use of this technique in therapy, I really wanted to know what research says about it.

PROMPT stands for Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets. PROMPT combines auditory input and visual cues with a tactile kinesthetic approach to therapy. So in addition to hearing and seeing, the therapists actually touches the client’s face in order to guide them to their target sound, word, or phrase. You can learn more details about PROMPT at their website.

Here is some research that I found related to PROMPT.

Dale, P. and Hayden, D. (2013) Treating Speech Subsystems in Childhood Apraxia of Speech With Tactile Input: The PROMPT APPROACH. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 644-661.
These researchers examined the effects of using PROMPT with children with childhood apraxia of speech. Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a speech sound disorder involving the planning and programming of movements required for speech sounds. These children are very difficult to understand.
Participants and Method: Four children who had been diagnosed with CAS were divided into two groups. Two of the children received eight weeks of full PROMPT. Two of the children received four weeks of PROMPT techniques without tactile kinesthetic prompts then four weeks of full PROMPT. Target words were chosen for each child. Standardized tests and untrained probe words were used for assessing progress.
Results: All children in the study showed significant improvement in the 16 weeks of intervention. Scores on the untreated probe words and on the articulation test showed some evidence that including the tactile kinesthetic cues results in more success.

Grigos, M., Hayden, D., and Eigen, J. (2010). Perceptual and Articulatory Changes in Speech Production Following PROMPT Treatment. Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology, 18, 46-53.
This study was to determine whether speech sound accuracy changed after PROMPT treatment.
Participants and Method: Two three year old males were participants in this study. One was a typically developing 3 year old was assessed. The other child had a speech disorder and received PROMPT treatment twice a week for eight weeks. This study differed in the first discussed in that, in addition to formal testing and untrained probe words, they used a motion capture system to receive a visual of the child’s articulatory movements.
Results: Pre-treatment, the child with speech disorder displayed severe deficits on an articulation assessment. He also demonstrated inappropriate oral motor behaviors. Results of this study indicated improvements in both articulatory movements and speech sound accuracy.

Other research about using PROMPT has been published regarding children with cerebral palsy and autism. You can also find research on the effects of using PROMPT on adults with aphasia and apraxia as well.

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